Cello di borbone

Cello di borbone

It’s a 16-string cello, the soundboard is made of spruce, the back and the sides are made of cherry-tree wood, the neck is made of maple, the fingerboard is made of rosewood, there are fine tuned Wittner tuning machines, harpsichord tuning pegs for the sympathetic strings.

Lyra viol

Lyra viol

I got inspired by various instruments (Indian ones, for example) and that’s how I could make this “lyra viol” which is a combination of a bowed viol, of a lyra and a banjo… I’ll try to find a musician (a true one!) to make a better demo…

Pochette

Pochette violin and its alto version

The pochette violin is made of curly walnut wood monoxyl, the fingerboard is made of boxwood, there’s a piezo mic. Alto model (viola version): the soundboard is made of spruce, service tree monoxyl, and there’s an active electrostatic mic.

Rebec

Rebec

The videos below shows the violin rebec, and you can hear 2 improvisations by Marion Zammarchi:

Violin rebec: for this instrument I used the same dimensions as the ones of a violin, all the position indicators are the same. Indeed, I noticed that lots of violon players don’t especially feel like changing the fingering and their positions to play medieval music. The instrument is very powerful, it’s perfect for musicians who play in the streets. The tuning machines (guitar ones) are hidden under a wooden cover that respects the look of the instrument and makes it quite simple to tune whatever the weather might be. It is fitted with an inner piezo mic.

6-string and 12-string rebec: 6-string rebecs have 3×2 strings and the 2 first strings are one octave higher pitched. The 12-string ones have 3 or 4 playing strings and sympathetic strings passing under the fingerboard.

The videos above shows a 6-string and a 12-string rebec and an impro by Marion Zammarchi sounding like a nice Indian music tune…

2-string violin

2-string violin made of skin

Marine trumpet

Marine trumpet

The name of this instrument is kind of problematic! How is it possible to give it the name of  “trumpet” whereas it’s a stringed instrument? Why would we call it “marine” whereas it has no relationship with sailing? Most of the time you find the following explanation about it:  this instrument used to be used in some convents of nuns for the call to prayer. It is called “trumpet” because it’s a signal instrument. As the word “marine” is a distorsion of “marian”, that is to say devoted to Holy Mary. This instrument sounds like a variation of a 1-string instrument, whose string would be bowed. The marine trumpet is usually bowed played (on the picture, I play it with a rosined wood stick).

Hurdy-gurdy trumpet

Hurdy-gurdy marine trumpet

The hurdy-gurdy marine trumpet was created by Philippe Berne & Dominique Engles. This instrument was first shown at the Château d’Ars meetings in St Chartier, July 11-14 2015…

Bowed citol

Bowed citol (or moorish)

A new soundboard allowed me to make this new 3-string bowed citol, and the model with 4 sympathetic strings on a second neck as well. And then came the model with 6 sympathetic strings on the second neck!

Bowed mandola

Bowed mandola